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Days Until November 8, 2022 - General Election
 

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Last Day to Register to Vote for November 8, 2022 Election is Tuesday, October 11, 2022

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October, 2022

Saturday
1
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LGBT History Month is celebrated every October in United States since 1994. It was first proposed by Missouri high school history teacher Rodney Wilson, who chose October due to the establishment of National Coming Out Day in the late 1980s on October 11. October also marks the first National March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, which took place in 1979. In addition to LGBT History Month, LGBT Pride Month is also celebrated each year in June to commemorate the Stonewall Riots.
Monday
3
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On Oct 3, 1965, Johnson signs the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) of 1965, which amended the 1952 INA by including a provision stating: No person shall receive any preference or priority or be discriminated against in the issuance of an immigrant visa because of the person‘s race, sex, nationality, place of birth, or place of residence.

Timeline:

1924 - Coolidge signs Johnson-Reed Act
Prevents immigration from Asia and establishes a quotas system

1952 - Truman vetoes McCarran-Walter Act (veto overridden by Congress)
Eliminates Asian exclusion and establishes a preference system for desirable ethnic groups

1965 - Johnson signs Hart-Celler Act
Eliminates policy of limiting immigration based on national origin

Note: See https://immigrationhistory.org/timeline for a description of immigration laws before 1924

Resources:

Johnson-Reed Act: https://history.state.gov/milestones/1921-1936/immigration-act

McCarran-Walter Act: https://history.state.gov/milestones/1945-1952/immigration-act

Hart-Celler Act: https://history.house.gov/Historical-Highlights/1951-2000/Immigration-and-Nationality-Act-of-1965

Coolidge’s INA Comments: https://www.coolidgefoundation.org/blog/were-all-in-the-same-boat-now-coolidge-on-immigration

Truman’s INA Comments: https://www.trumanlibrary.gov/public/Immigration_TrumanVeto.pdf

Johnson’s INA Comments:http://www.lbjlibrary.org/lyndon-baines-johnson/timeline/lbj-on-immigration
Thursday
6
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Thomas Mundy Peterson. Thomas, on March 31, 1870 (one day after the ratification of the 15th Amendment) became the first Black American to vote in a U.S. election.

Learn more:
-- Smithsonian: https://nmaahc.si.edu/object/nmaahc_2015.190
-- NJ State HIstory; https://nj.gov/state/historical/it-happened-here/ihhnj-er-peterson.pdf
-- Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlC3fsW3rRs
Sunday
9
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Mary Ann Shadd Cary.

Learn more: https://suffragistmemorial.org/african-american-women-leaders-in-the-suffrage-movement/
Tuesday
11
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Join us in celebrating the birthday of Eleanor Roosevelt born on this day in 1884.

After the League of Women Voters was founded in 1920 – the same year that Franklin D. Roosevelt ran for Vice President – she helped establish its policy agenda. As the League’s Vice President of Legislative Affairs, she lobbied for reforms in Congress and worked tirelessly to strengthen women’s role in politics, helping mobilize women voters through the League’s nonpartisan training and lobbying work.

Learn more:

-- LWV: https://www.lwv.org/blog/eleanor-roosevelt-first-lady-league-leader-pioneer

Photo Credit: LC-USZ62-25812, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division (@librarycongress)

http://loc.gov/pictures/resource/cph.3c08091/
Tuesday
11
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National Coming Out Day (NCOD) is an annual LGBTQ awareness day observed on October 11. The day commemorates the Oct. 11, 1987 March on Washington for Lesbian and Gay Rights, which included half a million participants.

Learn more:
-- HRC: https://www.hrc.org/resources/the-history-of-coming-out
-- APA: https://www.apa.org/pi/lgbt/resources/coming-out-day
-- GLAAD: https://www.glaad.org/tags/national-coming-out-day
-- Archive: https://gaycenter.org/archive_item/march-on-washington-for-lesbian-and-gay-rights
-- Image: https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc276218
Wednesday
12
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"In 1977 participants at the United Nations International Conference on Discrimination against Indigenous Populations in the Americas proposed that Indigenous Peoples’ Day replace Columbus Day.Indigenous Peoples’ Day recognizes that Native people are the first inhabitants of the Americas, including the lands that later became the United States of America. And it urges Americans to rethink history." https://www.smithsonianmag.com/blogs/national-museum-american-indian/2019/10/11/indigenous-peoples-day-2019

The following states and the District of Columbia observe Native American or Indigenous Peoples’ Day, in place of or in addition to Columbus Day:

-- Alabama

-- Alaska

-- District of Columbia

-- Hawaii

-- Idaho

-- Maine

-- Michigan

-- Minnesota

-- New Mexico

-- North Carolina

-- Oklahoma

-- Oregon

-- South Dakota

-- Vermont

-- Wisconsin


The state of Texas does not currently observer Indiginous People day, but the following local jurisdiction have made the change:

-- City of Austin

-- City of Dallas

-- City of San Antonio

-- County of Bexar



Learn more:

-- Smithsonian Mag: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/blogs/national-museum-american-indian/2019/10/11/indigenous-peoples-day-2019/:

-- PBS: https://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/npr/2019/10/14/769083847/columbus-day-or-indigenous-peoples-day/
Saturday
15
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#OnThisDay, the Supreme Court of the US (SCOTUS) ruled on a bundle of five cases (known as the Civil Rights Cases), and in an 8-1 decision, the court found the Civil Rights Act (CRA) of 1875 to be unconstitutional.

The CRA of 1875 was signed into law by President Ulysses S. Grant and was enacted during Reconstruction in response to civil rights violations against African Americans. The act guaranteed equal treatment in public accommodations and transportation. It also outlawing race-based discrimination in jury duty/selection. The five cases heard by SCOTUS included suites brought forth by African Americans who were denied access to segregated facilities.


Timeline:

-- 1866 Johnson vetos CRA of 1866, but veto is overridden by Congress (define citizenship and guaranteed citizens equal protection)
-- 1875 Grant signs CRA of 1875 (guaranteed African Americans equal treatment in public accommodations, public transportation, and prohibited their exclusion from jury service)
-- 1883 SCOTUS rules 7-1 that CRA of 1875 is unconstitutional
-- 1957 Eisenhower signs CRA of 1957 (forms the Civil Rights Commission)
-- 1960 Eisenhower signs CRA of 1960 (guaranteed qualified voters the right to register to vote
-- 1964 Johnson signs CRA of 1964 (prohibited discrimination in public accommodations and employment)
-- 1968 Johnson signs CRA of 1968 (guaranteed equal housing opportunities)
-- 1991 Bush signs the CRA of 1991 (expanded the rights of women and disabled persons)

Resources: SCOTUS Ruling:
http://cdn.loc.gov/service/ll/usrep/usrep109/usrep109003/usrep109003.pdf
Library of Congress: https://www.loc.gov/exhibits/civil-rights-act/legal-events-timeline.html
Wednesday
19
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The League of Women Voters of Texas, a nonpartisan political organization, was formed on October 19, 1919, at San Antonio, when the Texas Equal Suffrage Association was dissolved to reorganize for a new purposehttps://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/wel05
Saturday
22
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Christia Daniel Adair. Christia was an NAACP leader from Houston, worked for full suffrage and was one of the first black women to vote in a Democratic primary after the Supreme Court struck down Texas‘ white primary law in 1944. As executive secretary of the Houston NAACP for 12 years, she and others desegregated the Houston airport, public libraries, city buses, and department store dressing rooms. Despite official harassment, Adair and others rebuilt the Houston NAACP chapter, which grew to 10,000 members.

Learn more:
https://tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fad19
Sunday
23
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Join us in commemorating the birthday of Nina Otero-Warren. Nina was a civil rights leader, a suffragist, and an advocate for bilingual education.

In 1917, Otero-Warren was selected by Alice Paul to head the New Mexico chapter of the Congressional Union (precursor to the National Woman’s Party). She insisted that suffrage literature be published in both English and Spanish, in order to reach the widest audience.

She was Superintendent of Public Schools in Santa Fe County from 1918 to 1929, working to improve the conditions in rural Hispano and Native American communities. Otero-Warren argued that both Spanish and English be allowed in schools, despite the federal mandate of English-only. Despite losing her political campaign to run for a seat in the US House of Representatives, she remained politically and socially active, and served as the Chairman of New Mexico’s Board of Health; an executive board member of the American Red Cross; and director of an adult literacy program in New Mexico for the Works Projects Administration.

Learn more: https://www.nps.gov/people/nina-oter-warren.htm
Thursday
27
Denton ISD Central Offices
7:00 PM
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In person and via ZOOM @ Denton ISD Central Offices

 

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LWV Denton

PO Box 2544

Denton,  TX  76202


EIN 75-6056666
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